Euros In Croatia – Info About Croatian Currency

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Euros In Croatia – What Currency To Use In Croatia

Croatia is about to make the transition from our local currency, the Croatian Kuna, to the European Euro. This guide will be kept up-to-date as that process takes place.

Starting January 2023 Croatia will stop using Kuna, and begin to use Euro. So if you are planning your travel for then, keep that in mind. To get ready for the currency change over, prices in Croatia will be displayed in both Euro and Kuna starting summer 2022.

What Is The Currency In Croatia

Currency in Croatia - Money In Croatia

As Croatia is a member of the European Union, many people coming on vacation to Croatia are under the impression that Croatia uses Euro. As of 2022, we do not.

The official currency in Croatia is the Croatian Kuna, also shown as HRK and KN. Each Kuna is divided into 100 lipa coins.

Can I Use Dollars & Euros In Croatia

Since Croatia heavily relies on the tourist dollar (or Euro), many shops and small tour operators will take your dollars or euros as they are desperate not to lose the sale to someone else. Though be prepared, the exchange rate they give you will be horrendous, and your change will be given to you in Kuna.

Cash Or Credit Cards In Croatia

Croatian Kuna Currency

In short, debit and credit cards in Croatia are accepted widely. Bring them; they are safe to use. ATMs are located on practically every corner (though less so on the smaller islands).

When you start to use the ATM, you’ll be asked to select your language, and English is always one of the options. 

Just be warned you will not be able to use them to pay for small things like an espresso coffee – for that, you will need cash.

Cash Or Credit Card In Croatia

Everyone is always wondering if they should bring cash or their debit/credit card on vacation to Croatia.

After 21 years of traveling to Croatia, I can say you should use both. You will need a combination of the two.

As I mentioned above, you will need cash for small purchases, though I must also warn you that if you only have cards – ask before you sit down and enjoy your cocktails and dinner to be sure the place accepts cards.

Tipping In Croatia – Cash Or Card

If you want to leave a tip, you could simply round up the bill and tell them you don’t want the change, which will be very appreciated. In higher class restaurants, e.g., fine dining, the most common amount is to leave 10% – 15% of the bill total as a tip if you feel the server deserved it.

That said, how do you pay your tip? Cash or card?

If you’re paying the bill by card, you won’t find the facility to leave a tip this way, so you would have to leave cash on the table for the waiter instead. 

 

Croatia Travel Blog_What Currency Can You Use In Croatia

 

Kuna Denominations

Croatian banknotes are found in the following denominations :

5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, 500, and 1,000 – although I have never seen a 5!

Croatian coins come in

1, 2, and 5 kuna – and the lipa comes in coins of 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 50. These smaller coins are worthless, so I always leave them on the counter for the staff. After all, one lipa is just 0.13 cents.

Where To Get Kunas

Balkan Flags_Croatia 2

It is always nice to have cash on you when you land in a new country – that said, you’ll find the best exchange rates for Kunas in Croatia.

Exchanging money in Croatia is very easy; you can withdraw cash from ATMs or at one of the many money exchange points which are located all over the country. You’ll find them in city centers and shopping malls. 

Is Croatia Expensive

Yes. If you’re wondering, “is Croatia a cheap place to travel” I am sorry to say that you have missed that boat; it is no longer cheap unless you compare it to Paris or New York. 

Compared to its Balkan neighbors, the prices in Croatia are much higher. Especially in places like Dubrovnik, Split & popular islands.

What Will Be On The New Euro Coins & Notes?

The currency in Croatia now is called “kuna,” which in English translates to ‘marten,’ a type of woodland animal. We expect the new coins also to have a picture of a kuna!

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